Month: March 2012

On Staging a Fight Without Making a Man of Myself

This was written in response to Linda Leith’s Article “Bias against Women Writers? Heresy from a Fledging Publisher” I write today to throw in my 2 cents – indeed for what it’s worth – about how, or why men seem to dominate in the publishing world. It’s a dangerous area, I think, because I am definitely not an authority on the subject, only an observer. Perhaps I write about it today, because recently I opened old files of stories I had abandoned, finding the critique it had received from another writer. As constructive as he had tried to be, he had used words that spoke to me of my failure to produce a perfect piece. This time, years later, the words no longer had that effect. They were about the story, and I no longer were attached to the long hours I had spent on it. I happily started rewriting the story yesterday. What does that mean in relation to the gender domination issue? I want to avoid the stereotypes that people of my generation …

on lindaleith.com: Books, in Guatemala?

Read the full article on lindaleith.com I’m really glad that I don’t have to drive in Guatemala.  Our driver takes us on a road where a bridge collapsed during tropical storm Agatha, two or three years ago, but no one has bothered to rebuild it. On the other side of the river, a truck starts towards the river, showing the water depth to be about one foot. Julio, our expert driver, obviously knows he’ll go through. As I travel in this and other underdeveloped countries, I’ve found that people don’t seem to worry about things like a river crossing. They know a bridge or other infrastructure will not be built any time soon.  They’ll deal with problems when they occur. The same happens with their educational system. The central government may build schools, but it doesn’t seem to supply the books. A child may show up at school one day, but not the next, if the family’s priorities have changed one way or another. New teachers find themselves assigned to classes they can hardly manage, …